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Project Voice

Spearheaded by the voices of Asian/Asian American women, Project Voice is a Podcast series dedicated to increasing visibility on narratives from Asian America. As the host of Project Voice, I hope that this series will act as a digital space where members of our community can go to for guidance and resources. - Jessica Nguyen Founder and Host of Project Voice
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Oct 20, 2017

Today, I have the pleasure and honor to interview Emiko of Her Confidence Her Way, a Podcast series with a mission to guide Japanese women towards having self-confidence and living a meaningful life.

So, for every episode, I aim to make the topic applicable to the Asian/Asian American community but for this one, I wanted to tune into a more specific audience and that is, of course, the Japanese/Japanese American women listening out there. Despite the fact that Japan is one of the most technologically advanced countries of our time, like many other countries, it still has room for improvement for gender equality. We will be discussing on Japan's current state and progress in its agenda for women empowerment.

Emiko Rasmussen is a Confidence Building Coach, Virtual Mentor, Host of Her Confidence Her Way Podcast, Speaker and Leader of the Her Confidence Her Way Community. She helps Japanese women who don’t feel confident because of their self-limiting beliefs and language/cultural barriers. Emiko empowers Japanese women to be more confident by helping them break through their fears and discover their gifted talents so that they can do what they really want to do and live a meaningful life without worrying about someone else’s opinion.  

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Oct 6, 2017

Intersectionality is probably one of my favorite words of all time. In this episode, we will be covering some aspects of our identity that we may forget and overlook now and then when we're initiating dialogues about our struggles. Originally, I wanted to talk about how solely class plays a role in our lives, but my friend Rohena and I learned that you just can't talk about class without talking about other identity x-factors (i.e. citizenship status and education).

 

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Sep 22, 2017

In season 1, I have released an episode about what it means to be a part of the mixed Asian experience; this season, I wanted to add on to our discussion by exploring the intersection of Black and Asian identities as it is crucial to be aware of the fact that there is also a diversity of narratives of not just within the Asian/Asian American community but within the mixed Asian/Asian American community as well. Feeling inspired after watching Blasian Narratives, I invited Mieko Gavin to speak and share about her perspective and journey with self-identity as a Blasian American and the politics behind being labeled as mixed race, especially when it comes to mixed identities that don't center on whiteness. If there's anyone who would like to share their narrative as a non-white mixed Asian woman on Project Voice, please let me know!

Mieko Gavia is a writer, actress, and all-around oddball from Indianapolis, Indiana. After graduating from Oberlin College with a degree in Theater, Mieko followed the classic scenario of a small-town girl with big-city dreams and hightailed it to NYC. When she’s not acting or writing, Mieko can be spotted foraging in used bookstores or wherever cheap food abounds. You can catch her at http://www.blackrevolutionarytheatreworkshop.org and www.miekogavia.org 

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Sep 8, 2017

Welcome to another episode of Project Voice! Today, we will be discussing about a topic that surprisingly, is not brought up as often as it should be and that is disability! In this episode, Maya Ghorpade, Doris Jung, and I will be sharing our personal, intersectional experiences on growing up as Asian women with disabilities. Whether they are physical, mental, or intellectual, disabilities deserve to be included in every platform of discussion for marginalized communities. Tune in to learn about how having a disability affects every aspect of our lives, why more attention needs to be put forth on disability support services, and what kinds of efforts we can make to engage others in discussions on disability.

Maya is an 18 year old first generation Indian-American. She is a student at New York University's College of Nursing, and has plans to help revolutionize access to healthcare for People of Color. She enjoys making art, visiting museums, trying new foods, and taking naps. Her goal in life is to be at a place where she feels at peace with all of her intersecting identities.

Doris is a tiny 20-something year old full time paralegal by day and fashion illustrator and content creator by night! She runs a blog called "I Wear Shirts as Dresses" (iwearshirtsasdresses.com) to share her life as an individual with dwarfism and a lover of fashion. As a second generation Korean-American, she aims to bring awareness of disability and dwarfism in the Asian-American community, as disability is often a topic kept hidden in the dark.

 

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Aug 25, 2017

***Content warning

We can dedicate an entire mini series on mental health issues, but today, we'll be hearing Terra Hoy's personal hardships of mental health. This interview is the second episode of a 2 episode special on Project Voice. If you haven't listened to our first one, please check it out (we covered transgender identity issues, he-he)! Content warning: we will be diving into questions about anxiety, depression, and suicide. We will be listening to Terra's take on how mental health has played a role during her transition during the past couple years.

Terra is a queer, transgender womxn of color who is passionate about intersectional feminism. She intends to tackle institutional oppression, primarily focusing on healthcare for minority populations, including the socially and economically displaced, those LGBTQ+, people of color, and many more who are mis- or underrepresented. She is excited to share a bit of her perspective on Project Voice and hopes to utilize this platform to inspire other womxn and femme people of color. In time, she will lead in a policy-oriented career and education. She has the privilege of attending the University of Washington's School of Public Health to pave way towards a career reflecting her values and possibly enroll in the Evan's School of Public Policy and Governance. Check out her blog post on She Has Drive, a collective of authors that explore the issues facing women - it is titled "A Letter to my 12-Year-Old Self:" https://www.shehasdrive.com/home/2017/6/27/a-letter-to-my-12-year-old-self

 

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Aug 11, 2017

A womxn is not defined by her body. On this episode, I had the honor of inviting Terra Hoy to share with us her narratives of growing up as an Asian American and coming out as transgender. Key topics that we will be covering today will include trans-legitimacy, gender dysphoria, self biases and expectations from loved ones and society. This is the first interview of our 2 episode special - tune in in a couple of weeks for another episode with Terra! Next time, we will be refocusing on the importance of mental health.

Terra is a queer, transgender womxn of color who is passionate about intersectional feminism. She intends to tackle institutional oppression, primarily focusing on healthcare for minority populations, including the socially and economically displaced, those LGBTQ+, people of color, and many more who are mis- or underrepresented. She is excited to share a bit of her perspective on Project Voice and hopes to utilize this platform to inspire other womxn and femme people of color. In time, she will lead in a policy-oriented career and education. She has the privilege of attending the University of Washington's School of Public Health to pave way towards a career reflecting her values and possibly enroll in the Evan's School of Public Policy and Governance. Check out her blog post on She Has Drive, a collective of authors that explore the issues facing women - it is titled "A Letter to my 12-Year-Old Self:" https://www.shehasdrive.com/home/2017/6/27/a-letter-to-my-12-year-old-self

 

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Jul 28, 2017

What does it mean to be an activist in this day and age? In today’s episode, my awesome friend, Jennifer Li, and I will be covering topics ranging from how you can be involved as an activist for your Asian/Asian American community - whether it’s through social media, on the ground protests, or something else, why it’s important to support the Black Lives Matter movement, what it means to be a “good white ally,” and what we should do as a community under the Trump presidency.  Besides listening to this Podcast episode, we’d greatly encourage others to take the time out to learn the history of Asian America so that we can better understand how we got here and where we can go from here.

Jennifer Li is a digital advocacy strategist and social justice activist. She comes up with creative campaigns and tackles her projects with unparalleled passion and efficiency. Jennifer is currently the California State Director of Rise, multi-sector coalition of sexual assault survivors and allies working to empower all survivors with civil rights.
 
She launched the #takedownjulienblanc campaign in 2014 that got a pick-up artist banned from several countries. Her personal work has been covered by CNN, Times Magazine, The New York Times, The Guardian, The Huffington Post, BBC, Japan Times, Tokyo Vice, The Independent, The Washington Post, Salon, Gawker, Jezebel, Think Progress, The Daily Beast, Al Jazeera, and more.
 
 
 

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Jul 14, 2017

Last year, I had a life crisis that threw me into a whirlwind of questions for me - and I have to say, subconsciously trying to live up to the model minority myth made the experience worse: What do I really want to do with my life? Am I really happy with sticking to this one path? Is the 9-5 city work lifestyle really for me? So, I sought out the advice of someone who I looked up to since I was a girl, my older cousin, Thanh Ho (she also goes by Jenny or Clementine). Her words actually changed my life since. In this week’s episode, you’ll have the opportunity to hear her story after her decision to quit Corporate America. This Podcast episode isn’t meant to criticize those who’ve chosen the traditional, stable 9 to 5 work life, but it’s more to critique our fears and our society and family’s perception of what success means. Screw the model minority. What other people think about you do not define you. Start living the life that YOU want.

Thanh is a 1st generation, 27-year-old Vietnamese American - born in Vietnam and grew up in the United States.  She graduated from the University of Southern California, majoring in International relations. Currently, she's working as an artist in New Zealand. Her interests include permaculture, hiking, singing, acting, and dancing. Her life goal is to grow and give to the best of her ability.

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Jun 30, 2017

I didn’t think releasing one episode on the queer Asian American experience could be justified as having enough content that’s representative of the LGBTQIA Asian/Asian American community, so I’m making a return to share more of such narratives  - this time, the interview will be from perspectives of two fellow Smith College alumna friends of mine: Samantha and Shay. As you can tell from the title, we’ll be sharing our thoughts on why we need to break down heteronormative expectations from romantic relationships and and begin normalizing queerness instead.

Sam is a 1.5 generation Taiwanese-American who recently made it to her third decade. She isn’t into labels which is why if she had to pick, it would be some all-encompassing one like “queer” or “depends on the day”. She’s currently a professional student working on her Ph.D. at Tufts University in neuroscience. Her hobbies include fantasy football, drinking bourbon and making lists. Her life goals include feeling like an adult one day.

Shay is a Boston transplant originally from Long Island that is currently working in the fast paced world of Digital Marketing. She enjoys trying new restaurants, bringing in baked goods for her coworkers, planning elaborate themed dinner parties and hanging out with her nieces and nephews as much as possible. A current activity is wedding planning which is both equally exciting and anxiety inducing. Her goal in life is to have a happy home with lots of space and nice things that serves as a central point for friends and family to flock to.

Jun 16, 2017

On May 7th, 2017, I was invited to speak as a spring speaker for the Asian Pacific American Coalition (APAC) at Northwestern University. I'd like to thank everyone who had helped organize this event. Speakers included Olivia Park of Sad Asian Girls, Jessica Nguyen of Project Voice, and artist and writer Larissa Pham. "They will be discussing how they use art and media as outlets for political and social activism. Come through to meet these RAD ASIAN GIRLS." - APAC

The Asian Pacific American Coalition (APAC) is a student-organization at Northwestern University that strives to raise Asian/Asian American awareness and community-building on campus. This recording was taken by a video recorded and edited by Northwestern University student Seri Lee.

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Olivia Park is a graphic designer and the co-founder of Sad Asian Girls, an alias used by her and Esther Fan to make social/political work that surrounds their identities as East-Asians who are living in western spaces.

Olivia Park is a Korean-American woman born in Queens, NY and raised in Metro-Atlanta, GA. Her partner, Esther Fan is a Taiwanese-Canadian genderqueer femme raised in Vancouver, CA. Their studio practice is currently based in Providence, RI.

Sad Asian Girls have been featured on multiple platforms such as PBS, Huffington Post, NowThis, Dazed Digital, Nylon, i-D, Milk, Elephant Mag, Gal-dem, and Banana Mag. Currently, Olivia and Esther are touring around institutions, such as Princeton, Yale, Wellesley, Duke, and Columbia, in the United States to share their SAG story.

View their work here: http://www.sadcontent.com/work/

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Jessica Nguyen is the host of Project Voice, which is a Podcast series dedicated to increasing visibility on narratives from Asian America and spearheaded by the voices of Asian American women. As the host, Jessica hopes that this series will act as a digital space where members of her community can go to for guidance and resources. Jessica is also a freelance content creator working on numerous projects such as blogging, photography, video and copywriting.

Jessica is a Vietnamese-American woman who grew up in the suburbs of Chicago, but is currently based in Boston, Massachusetts. She used to have a hard time sharing her voice since she was not able to communicate in English in the beginning. It held back her confidence to speak her voice. After learning to express herself through writing and creating her podcast, Jessica is now more confident on sharing her voice and mission to the world.

Visit her work here: http://www.projectvoiceaaw.com

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Larissa Pham was born in Portland, Oregon and graduated from Yale University in 2014 with a degree in History of Art and Studio Art with a concentration in painting.

"Her art and writing has appeared or is forthcoming in The Paris Review Daily, Guernica, The Nation, Rolling Stone, Adult Mag, Nerve, New York Magazine, Maxim, ELLE, Dazed, Salon, Adbusters, GOOD, The Rumpus, The Hairpin, Gawker, VICE, The Intentional, Packet Bi-Weekly, The Yale Literary Magazine, and elsewhere.

She is the author of Fantasian, a New Lovers novella from Badlands Unlimited, out October 25, 2016. You can purchase Fantasian here, or in stores worldwide."

View her work here: http://larissapham.com

 

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May 31, 2017

I’m starting off the season with a topic very close to my heart: growing up as a child of refugee immigrant parents. My friend, Saroeun, and I will be sharing our personal struggles growing up as first-born children of immigrant parents who moved because they didn’t have t choice - from overcoming barriers with the English language to helping our parents translate in day-to-day situations to guiding our younger siblings to a better life as Southeast Asian Americans. I hope that this 2-episode special will help people understand better where we’re coming from and why today’s immigration issue should hit close to everyone’s heart. Here is part 1. Look forward to next week for part 2!

Here is part 2 of our 3rd season episode premiere. I made the conscious choice to not omit any parts of the conversation because I thought some of the emotional value would be lost if I had. I apologize for the length of the conversation but I do hope you understand why I’m leaving the conversation uncut.

Saroeun Moungyiv is a 1st generation Cambodian American. She has a cosmetology license and is a nail technician at her mother's shop. Her ambition is simply to help her parents' dream of becoming business owners come true and hope to have people understand the value of true happiness in themselves and in life.

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May 19, 2017

SEASON 3 is FINALLY HERE!

I’m starting off the season with a topic very close to my heart: growing up as a child of refugee immigrant parents. My friend, Saroeun, and I will be sharing our personal struggles growing up as first-born children of immigrant parents who moved because they didn’t have a choice - from overcoming barriers with the English language to helping our parents translate in day-to-day situations to guiding our younger siblings to a better life as Southeast Asian Americans. I hope that this 2-episode special will help people understand better where we’re coming from and why today’s immigration issue should hit close to everyone’s heart. Here is part 1. Look forward to next week for part 2!

Saroeun Moungyiv is a 1st generation Cambodian American. She has a cosmetology license and is a nail technician at her mother's shop. Her ambition is simply to help her parents' dream of becoming business owners come true and hope to have people understand the value of true happiness in themselves and in life.

 

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Mar 30, 2017

We are going to end season 2 with a 2-in-1 bang! Fighting work discrimination and aspiring whiteness are some pretty heavy topics that my anonymous friend and I were able to discuss within less than an hour, amazingly enough - perfect for all of you individuals out there who just want the straight truths while you're on the get go. We've heard of how being seen as the model minority has hurt us a million times already, so why not put it into context while bringing up the flaws of our modern day American workplace system? For example, how do we combat microaggressions that we see day to day at work? Later on in the episode, we will touch upon some of us whose subconscious desire is to become white or like white and discuss how what it means to aspire whiteness is different from what it means to be labeled as "whitewashed."

My speaker for this week's episode is a Bangladeshi woman who is currently working at an economic consulting firm in the U.S. Her areas of interest include labor economics, environmental economics, immigration and economics of inequality, anti-trust and competition. Outside of work she enjoys exercise, coffee, talking long walks and engaging in conversations about social justice and politics.

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Mar 22, 2017

Sibling rivalry doesn’t really pertain to only our community but like the topic of parenting, there are still cultural implications that exist and they affect our family dynamics. It didn’t occur to me that I could explore this topic until I began reflecting on my relationship with my own sister just a couple weeks ago. I am very proud and excited to showcase my best friend and younger sister, Joanne Nguyen, in this episode. Look forward to an hour’s worth of her words of advice and encouragement as she brings us back to what it’s like for us growing up together and what our relationship is like now in this week’s episode.

Joanne Nguyen is an aspiring graphic designer and musician who finds solace in listening to Korean music (mainly R&B, her current obsession being DΞΔN) and watching dramas (currently watching Weightlifting Fairy Kim Bok Joo, highly recommend if you’re looking for OTP cuteness). She’s currently a sophomore at Stanford University who thinks she wants to major in Communications and minor in East Asian Studies with a Korean subplan, but she’s still lost and trying to find her calling in life. She loves heart-to-hearts and dreams of one day opening a coffee shop in Korea where people can come to relax and have thought-provoking and deep conversations. She loves to create and perform whether that is through graphic designing, singing, dancing, or crocheting. Check out her portfolio at https://joannemainguyen.wordpress.com.

 

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Mar 15, 2017

The Asian American adoptee experience is an experience shared by thousands of voices of those I wished I had the opportunity of interviewing. Similar to narratives of mixed Asian Americans, narratives of Asian American adoptees need to be heard more. Luckily for this Podcast, I was able to speak with two of my amazing friends, Laurelin Haas and Andrea MacGowan. The reason why I invited them specifically on this episode is to showcase the stark contrast between their responses to my questions regarding their life journey and changing self-perception, proving that once again, there is no such thing as a "standard Asian American adoptee experience." As the host of Project Voice, one of the biggest challenges I've faced is ensuring that I am not creating a spectacle out of my interviewees and it's especially tricky when one of main jobs is asking them questions. Tune in to listen to what they have to say about my concerns and much more!

Laurelin Haas is a recent graduate of Iowa State University. She is an adoptee from China, and she has three younger sisters (all also adopted from China). Laurelin was raised in the Midwest and has connected to her Chinese roots by studying the language and studying abroad in Shanghai.

Andrea MacGown is a junior majoring in philosophy and minoring in logic at Smith College. Her passions are social justice for black lives matter, Asian rights, sexuality, and women's rights. In her free time, she watches movies and anime. She is interested in learning different languages such as Mandarin and French. Andrea loves streetwear, Korean skincare, boba tea, and fighting the system.

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Mar 8, 2017

Relationships and dating are topics that we just naturally gravitate towards because let’s be real, they can be pretty fun to talk about regardless of where you are in life. But on Project Voice, we can be both fun and serious at the same time - let’s talk about interracial dating, shall we! Once considered a taboo topic, the 101 of interracial dating has not been covered as often as it should be even now - online or offline. In this episode, I had the special opportunity to interview my friend Cleo Bergman and ask her about her thoughts on what it’s like to be with someone who grew up in a different world from her. We’re not going to lie, the dynamics of interracial dating can be tricky to navigate through but one key lesson that we've gained from exploring this topic is that communication will always be important, dating or no dating.

Cleo is a biracial (Asian and white), straight woman living in NYC with a Japanese mother and an American father. She hopes to pursue a career in writing or work in a chocolate factory.

 

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Mar 1, 2017

Here’s the first Podcast episode in which I’m going to take a step aside and give space to those who are part of the mixed Asian American community to share their stories. It’s important to keep in mind of the rich diversity of voices within the community of Asian American women representing us. It was a huge privilege to be able to interview Chloe Lin and Hanako O'Leary for this episode, so I'm excited to share their narratives with you. For listeners who can relate to the experiences of my interviewees, I hope that our conversations - especially for this episode - can be a comforting experience for you to be a part of - you are not alone.

Chloe Lin is, among other things, a first-generation, mixed-race, bisexual Asian-American woman. She was raised in the San Gabriel Valley of Los Angeles County by her Taiwanese-Chinese mother, and now resides in Boston, where she works as a guide and museum assistant for various historic sites. She graduated from Smith College in 2016 as a history major and museum studies minor, and is adjusting to Adult Life by reading books of all kinds, cooking with friends, and avoiding learning how to drive. She thanks you for listening to this podcast, and hopes you have a lovely day.

Hanako O’Leary, (aka HannyaGrrrl) is a first generation Japanese-American.  Upon receiving her BFA in ceramics, Hanako O'Leary left the mid-west to pursue a career in clay. Settling in Seattle, she became frustrated with the insular, white-washed nature of the the fine art world, struggling to find her voice as a biracial womyn artist. After becoming involved in local cultural nonprofits and community art projects, Hanako decided to pursue her MFA in Arts Leadership.  As an arts administrator she believed she could create access into the fine art-world for those who create work outside the canon of Eurocentric aesthetics.

In her two year journey through Seattle University's Arts Leadership program, Hanako realized leadership in the arts was not exclusive to those in administrative positions.  In those years she found her voice as an artist, participating in socially engaged public art projects and exhibits throughout Seattle. Currently she is exploring social media as public art space and it’s influence in building community. Recent inspirations/ aspirations include Edo period Japan, comic illustration, intersectional feminism, and of course, smashing the patriarchy.

 

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Feb 22, 2017

Oh, expectations. We can just never get tired of talking about them. That’s why we’ve decided to dedicate a whole episode on expectations! Got to love them. And as Ceci Kim, an awesome fellow classmate from my Asian American studies course has intended, our conversation will focus on expectations put upon us in contexts that are broader than just your average work or school environment. How have expectations from our family and society shaped us growing up? How have we reacted to them in the past? How have they informed us to make decisions in our life (from big to small)? Tune in for the answers!

Ceci is a second generation Korean American currently in grad school in New York. She spends most of her time hanging out with her dog, watching Korean dramas, and searching for the perfect bowl of noodles.

 

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Feb 15, 2017

As Asian women, it is unfortunate for us to feel pressures to conform to society’s westernized beauty standards based on our gender and race. From the shade of our skin to the size of our eyes, we are scrutinized for having what we have instead of being told that we are beautiful and that we are enough. In this episode, I will be holding my largest group interview with my fellow Southeast Asian gals, Gift Inthaly, Danielle DeGuzman, and last but not least, Rosenna Moungyiv on their personal insights on what really matters (hint: #bodylove).

Gift Inthaly is a second generation Thai-Laotian American who is currently pursuing a bachelor of science in nursing. After graduating college and becoming a nurse, she hopes to be able to someday travel all over the the world.

Second generation and Filipino American, Danielle DeGuzman is currently in college pursuing a bachelor's degree in nursing. She hopes to experience all the world that it has to offer, so she can better understand herself and others.

Rosenna Moungyiv is a second generation Cambodian American who is currently studying nursing and enjoying her newfound passion in her work taking care of patients at a local nursing home. 

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Feb 8, 2017

Thank you for tuning in to listen to SEASON 2 of Project Voice! Let's kick off the new season with a topic that many of us constantly have to grapple with regardless of how old we are: interacting with our parents.

I wouldn't say that all Asian parents are strict and conservative by nature, but I would like to open the floor to discuss the reasons why some of them are that way to their children. I think that it's more important to focus on how different our beliefs and values are to our parents as it is quite a unique experience growing up as an Asian in the U.S. in which you experience cultural clashes within your home everyday. In this episode, my friend Swati and I will share stories on how we cope with our differences and disagreements with our parents.

Swati Sharma is a neuroscience research assistant at a pharmaceutical company who loves comedy and singing, and is passionate about learning new things and making the world a better place. I'm so excited to have her as my first guest of the season on Project Voice!

 

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Jan 25, 2017

Before we dive into a new season of Project Voice, I wanted to share with you a bonus mini episode that was prepared for an interview I had stumbled upon from last summer. For the interview, I had the wonderful opportunity to speak with Lisa Chin, a holistic mama to a happy two year old girl. We connected quickly over our love for creating content for communities that we care about and since then, have updated with each other on our current passion projects.

I think I was lucky to have met Lisa because I don't think you can put her in a box when it comes to what she does. From blogging at Lisa for Real to hosting an online summit dedicated to supporting in mothers in their postpartum period called The Fourth Trimester Summit (www.fourthtrimestersummit.com), she is on a roll!

In this episode,  Lisa shares her thoughts on how motherhood has changed her perception on self-identity and the significance of reconnecting with one's roots. Why is exploring your cultural identity so important?

Bonus: If you're looking to be inspired to create as part of your 2017 journey, listen in for some of her own words of encouragement!

If you do get a chance, check out her blog at lisaforreal.com!:

"Lisa for Real is a catalouge (yup, I just got British on you) of my realest thoughts. It is me for real. My personal musings on feminine power in the areas of careers, relationships, motherhood, self identity, and whatever else I am drawn to.

I am also for real, as in authenticity, in wholeness, in being true to ourselves. This includes being for real health, food, relationships, hugs, connection, careers, business, identity and it goes on…" - Lisa Chin

 

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Jan 18, 2017

We're 8 episodes in and there are plenty on the backend here ready to go! However, before I jump into releasing a preview of my next batch of episodes, I wanted to take a moment to reflect on the work that I was able to create with my guest speakers so far. As unique and personal these narratives are, lot of the content in them are made to be relatable.

Project Voice is and will always be led by voices of Asian women living the American experience BUT THAT DOES NOT MEAN that this Podcast is made to be exclusive. If you identify as an Asian/Asian American man or non-binary, a non-Asian person of color, or a human being who's interested in exploring self-identity, you are more than welcome to listen. Just because you are not part of my group of speakers, doesn't mean you can't listen or relate to our stories.

MISSION STATEMENT: Spearheaded by the voices of Asian/Asian American women, Project Voice is a podcast series dedicated to increasing visibility on issues that the Asian community has faced in the U.S. as well as providing a digital space where members can go to for guidance and resources.

 

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Jan 11, 2017

We are going to take a break from our usual conversations over social justice and identity, and focus on concerns that everyone has navigating though the real world. I hope that this Podcast episode will be of great value, particularly to our younger audience who are going through their own college and post-grad life struggles. Tune in to hear what advice Linh and I have to share for those who are looking to find their own meanings of happiness and success. Topics that we will be covering include choosing your college major, tips on finding the right work culture that fits you, and working with the time you have outside of school and work. Also, don't miss out what juicy things we have to say about living our twenties so far!

Linh Le, Smith College '15, is a close friend of mine.😉 (Jess: aye, she wrote this) Originally from Vietnam, she went to the US when she was 16, and is currently working as a software developer in a financial firm in San Francisco. In college, she majored in Computer Science and minored in East Asian Literature and Languages (which she will tell you has no real value in the real world). When she's not working, she enjoys dancing and learning new things.

DID YOU KNOW that Project Voice was originally an idea conceived back in 2013-2014?  Yes, Linh was the person I invited to co-host Project Voice with at that time and that should say a lot. Having conversations with her in the past has greatly inspired and pushed me to grow as a person - more specifically, as a speaker on topics I care about. 

 

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projectvoiceaaw@gmail.com

Jan 4, 2017

Even within our community, queer Asians can sometimes be pushed aside from having their needs met. In this episode, my close friend Angela and I will be sharing our thoughts and opinions on some of the issues that the LGBTQIA community face in and outside Asian America.  What role does gender presentation have on how queerness is perceived? How do your gender and sexuality impact your relationship with race and religion? What are some resources and safe spaces that we can go to for guidance and solidarity? I hope that this episode will further more dialogues on the dynamics between queer culture and the Asian communities in the U.S. If you would like to continue this conversation in future episodes, please email me at projectvoiceaaw@gmail.com! I am currently seeking out for volunteers who are passionate about sharing their take on LGBQTIA issues.

Angela Y. Law is an aspiring educator, poet, and artist whose passion is finding beauty in people and places around her. She is a first generation Chinese Pacific American and college graduate. Read her work at: http://yutongthepoet.wordpress.com

She is also a dear friend of mine who I can never get tired of having conversations on social justice and identity issues with, so I'm very excited to have her voice finally being heard on my Podcast. We actually recorded this episode back when the series was starting out so we only got about 20 minutes' worth of content related to this topic. Again, if you're looking for ways to contribute to the queer Asian community, being a guest speaker of mine is one way of doing so!

 

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Dec 28, 2016

We often forget that even Asian millennials have different personal experiences from each other. This realization has led me to reflect upon how different narratives between generations can be.Hence, I thought it would be helpful and personally significant to many of our listeners to shed light on what it means to be part of the 1.5 generation.  In this episode, we discuss the barriers that my guest speakers, Soojin Cho and Tam Nguyen, have faced transitioning into a world outside of their home culture. (And for those of you who don't know who the 1.5 generation includes, you should tune in!)

Tam Nguyen is a caffeine-craving, cat-obsessed introvert. As a 1.5 Vietnamese American, she is always curious about how cultures influence one’s psyche and identity. She graduated from Smith College in May 2016 and now is working as an application systems analyst for Smith College. Being able to understand people, understand design, and understand how technology can include human-centered design is very important to her. She also likes to make art and see art.

Sooj Cho is a Korean American. After graduating with a bachelor's in economics and chemistry at Boston College, Soo went on to work in the city's growing biotech scene. She is currently working as a project engineer at widely-known healthcare technology firm. Fun fact: she was the Associate Director of Entrepreneurship of the National Association of Asian American Professionals - Boston Chapter (NAAAP Boston) and was one of the lead organizers of Asiafest.

Follow Project Voice:
facebook.com/projectvoiceaaw
twitter.com/projectvoiceaaw
projectvoiceaaw@gmail.com

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